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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
as it was unfolding. colombian national police worked alongside agents from ice, the u.s. immigration and customs enforcement agency, whose job, among other things, is to prevent contraband from moving across u.s. borders. the amount of cocaine and money the super cartel smuggled was incomprehensible, and it took authorities by surprise. u.s. ice agents first got a glimpse of what they were up against when they arrived here in september 2009, the sprawling pacific coast port of buenaventura, colombia. the agents got a tip to be on the lookout for cargo containers of fertilizer arriving from mexico. they were stunned by what they found. >> there it is! >> holy ( bleep ). >> logan: shrink-wrapped bundles of money. this one is $700,000 u.s. in $20 bills. as they searched through more containers, both here and in mexico, they found staggering amounts of cash. more and more money, $41 million in that first seizure alone. you'd never actually seen anything like it? >> luis sierra: no, we'd never seen containers full of cash. >> logan: luis sierra was directing the ice operation that day. he told us tha
in the history of political polling. 33 seats are up for grabs in the u.s. senate, which used to be known as the world's greatest deliberative body, a place where difficult issues were carefully considered and debated until a consensus or a compromise was reached. today, it's known more for deadlock, dysfunction, and political gamesmanship, a body unwilling or unable to resolve the major issues of the day-- jobs, deficits, taxes, and how to allocate $1.2 trillion in automatic budget cuts set to go into effect january 1. a number of respected senators have thrown up their hands and quit, and others are speaking out against an institution many think is broken. one powerful senator had this advice for the voters. >> tom coburn: the best thing that could happen is all of us lose and send some people up here who care more about the country than they do their political party or their position in politics. >> kroft: senator tom coburn of oklahoma is one of the most influential and conservative members of the senate. he's blocked hundreds of pieces of legislation that he thinks are a waste of mon
, but it turns out there are more than three million open jobs in the u.s. right now with as many as 500,000 of those in manufacturing. employers complain they can't qualified, skilled workers. how is that possible in this economy? that's our story tonight. >> come along with david mccullough when he goes along on our journey to paris before independence, a time of a new generation. >> they came here in order to improve themselves and to thereby improve their country. >> as for this generation of americans, america's favorite historian is less than enthusiastic. >> we are raising children in america today who by in large historically are ill it illiter. >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm lesley stahl. >> i'm morley safer. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm byron pitts. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing fro
close, as you will tonight. most of them are home grown in the u.s.a. full disclosure-- i am a big fan, and even served on the board of the new york city ballet, which was founded in 1948 by the great choreographer george balanchine. he revolutionized classical dance and ushered in a golden age as ballet master of the company. now, at a time when many cultural institutions are under stress, we went behind the scenes to see how this company is keeping this elegant art form alive. ♪ ♪ the dancers at the new york city ballet epitomize the beauty, athleticism, the seeming effortlessness, and the grace of classical ballet. ( applause ) ♪ ♪ saving it from becoming a dying art form has fallen on the shoulders of this man, peter martins, ballet master in chief of the new york city ballet since 1983. >> peter martins: and... >> stahl: martins teaches and trains. >> martins: ...advance forward. >> stahl: he's one of the company's top choreographers. he oversees fund raising and marketing. if the ballet were the yankees, he'd be both the general manager and the coach. >> martins: that's
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)